The case for Twitter’s independence (unless Google or management buys)

This was posted on 7 October 2016 at TechCrunch
Original Here

Keith Teare
CRUNCH NETWORK CONTRIBUTOR

Keith Teare is the co-founder of TechCrunch and today runs Palo Alto incubator Archimedes Labs.

The problems associated with the widespread rumors of Twitters “for sale” status and that the management team is divided on whether or not to sell the company were compounded this morning with reports that Google, Disney and Apple will not be bidders. The stock price is down 20% to $19.79 at the time of writing.

Who runs Twitter — Board or Management?

The impressive Board of Directors seems to have set itself against CEO Jack Dorsey by seeking an exit. This is not the first time the company seems to be being run by the Board rather than the management. Previous changes in strategy, management and even the decision to IPO do not seem to have been organic decisions planned by management but rather reactive Board led decisions.

As anybody who has run a business knows, a Board-Management tug-of-war almost never results in a win. Boards hold managers accountable on behalf of shareholders, and managers run companies. It is not clear that this is the case at Twitter and that may be the source of many of the issues.

The Board is made up of many celebrity figures including Peter Fenton, Marjorie Scardino, Bret Taylor, David Rosenblatt, Martha Lane Fox and Omid Kordestani. Previously Fred Wilson had also been a strong minded Board member. The Board’s opinions about the strategy and tactics may reflect a weak management needing direction, or may represent frustrated operators hoping for an exit and seeking to influence day-to-day decisions. Only an insider knows. But one thing is clear, unless Twitter management actually runs the company, the future of the company will be bleak.

The case for “No”

Why no? In principle, Twitter is the communications bus for the entire world. I would guess that 2–3 billion people a month see a Tweet mentioned on TV, radio, in a movie, in print. It has become an almost ubiquitous broadcast platform for anybody wishing to publish an event, an opinion, a riposte. It is a marketing platform used by every brand in the world. Compared to the other means of disseminating content, Twitter is a giant.

In its earliest manifestation, Twitter understood its position as a message dissemination infrastructure. It was happy for third parties to “carry” its messages to consumers and businesses via software integrations with its APIs. The potential reach of a Tweet was the addition of people who went to twitter.com, as well as people who used a piece of software provided by a third party to disseminate tweets.

Others were allowed to index tweets and provide filtered views showing tweets that pertained to a topic or an interest. It was an open and widely distributed platform, somewhat like the internet itself. Search engines could index and point to it just as they do web pages.

The biggest version of Twitter one could imagine?

This stage of Twitter’s development evoked its true potential, and was the manifestation of the biggest version of Twitter one could imagine. A universal data bus for everything important now. With an index and search open to developers.

The business model for this stage was obvious. An ad every n tweets no matter which environment the Tweet stream was consumed through, with Twitter as the “AdSense” and “AdWords” of the whole thing. This would have resulted in Google-sized revenues quickly.

The smallest version of Twitter one could imagine?

But at that time, there was a belief that Twitter needed to become a destination. This implied that any ability for a third party to take tweets and re-broadcast them through another app or site was bad. It implied that indexing and searching tweets was to be blocked, it set Twitter against its disseminators. By doing so, it limited the Twitter audience to those who directly engaged with the properties owned and operated by the company.

This was the smallest version of Twitter one could imagine. It seems clear that many at the board level wanted Twitter to be a destination, a Yahoo if you will. And to create content “channels” that would attract the audience for the channel. And to prevent any other means of accessing those channels.

This allowed Twitter to become a branded destination and created the conditions where its key KPIs were not “tweets seen” but became “logged-in users” on a Twitter-owned property. The advertising platform Twitter has so impressively built over the past 3–4 years is based on top of this approach.

The $2 billion or so in revenues it generates is impressive, but tiny compared to what would result from a truly universal data bus available everywhere. This would be a replacement of Google for content discovery, whereas the current Twitter is at best a replacement for Yahoo as a destination for content — and a poor one at that.

IPO was premature?

Twitter’s IPO was done before the company had truly completed its transition to becoming a content-rich destination site. The suspicion is that the need to IPO early was driven by board decisions and not organic management choice.

Dick Costolo did an excellent job of trying to manage a ship in a storm that had only partial navigation, but the stock price ultimately reflected two things. Firstly, a company that could not accurately predict revenues and, secondly, one that had a KPI (logged-in users) that was always going to be its worst metric. The market took the direction of the board and management that Twitter wanted to be a branded portal business with advertising and measured it accordingly.

Most of the 2013–2016 ailments of Twitter emanate from this product decision and the decision to IPO before it was completely built and functioning. The management changes, the stock performance, the yearning to sell the company.

The case for “Yes”

Twitter is a dysfunctional company with an interfering board and, like any dysfunctional family, it needs a divorce. A buyer would gain a clean slate and would be able to build the biggest possible version of Twitter, free of internal squabbles.

This is the strongest case for a sale. But who should be the buyer if this outcome is wanted? There are only two good answers. One is Google, the other is a private equity buy-out.

Google is the obvious buyer. A universal data bus carrying everything that is important now to the entire world, with ads every n Tweets would probably have revenues close to and eventually surpassing web-search revenues.

With the emergence of live video — an area YouTube should excel in — the impact of this would be compounded by the video ad opportunity. And the vision would be well-aligned with Google’s “organize the World’s Information, and make it Accessible” vision. If Google is truly out of the race, Larry or Sergey or David Drummond — call me and let me explain why you should re-consider. I’m always available at http://chat.center/keith.

Twitter is a dysfunctional company with an interfering board and, like any dysfunctional family, it needs a divorce.

If Google really is out of the running, the next best sale is to PE. Silverlake, KKR or Blackrock should look at how they worked with Skype previously and consider taking Twitter private, removing the short-term thinking and re-launch it as the biggest version of Twitter it can be. That company could own digital advertising and audience engagement for decades to come.

If neither option materializes, Twitter should take itself private — Qihoo360 just did this, as did Dell. There would be no shortage of banks interested in helping.

What’s next for Twitter?

The board should not sell Twitter to a media or content buyer. By doing so they would cheat the world by taking away a wonderful chance to build a universal data and messaging bus able to scale to the challenges of 4 billion smartphone owners wanting news, entertainment, live video and more.

Management should go back to Twitter’s founding principles and build that universal, open, biggest possible version of Twitter.

And the markets should give the company the space to perform such a transition.

Twitter is not Yahoo. It is a baby, struggling to grow up. Infanticide is wrong. Let the children grow.

Cloud based services – the future of the Internet

Fred Wilson has a response today to Eric Schmidt’s declaration in Edinburgh that Google+ is an “identity service”. He asks and answers his own question.

“whom Google built this service for? You or them. And the answer to why you need to use your real name in the service is because they need you to.”

Of course Facebook is also an identity service. Facebook Connect is the means of distributing it. And of course Facebook too is built using real names because “they need you to”.

At this level FaceBook and Google have much in common, and both are vying for us to use them for online authentication. Facebook is far ahead of course.

Late yesterday I posted an opinion piece as a guest author on TechCrunch. It is about the uncertain future of web services as mobile devices proliferate globally. We will soon all have awesome identity machines in our pocket. They will be capable of being used to authenticate us (even using 2 step authentication). Any cloud-based 3rd party identity system will be unnecessary.

The future of identity is distributed, under user control, and owned and managed by the user from their device. It will be capable of supporting anonymity and real names and will be able to be trusted by sites requiring you to authenticate. The idea of any 3rd party dictating how you can present yourself online will no longer be applicable. Of course, it still has to be built…..

Having said that, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Google and/or Facebook building an identity system that dictates how we present ourselves. Our choice is to use it or not…..We don’t have to.

Google Books enables Embedding

Here is a book I wrote in 1988 for Penguin. It is available free on Google books. And as of today I can embed it in a web page.

With the recent rise to prominence in the UK of the BNP, it may be an interesting read again. At the time I used a non-de-plume (Keith Tompson) because it was actually dangerous to be an open and active anti-racist.

It also has some relevance to the internet debate about race hatred.

OpenID and Data Portability

Nicolas Popp – a leading advocate of Open Identity and data solutions – posted on his VeriSign blog today following the rather heated discussions that have ensued since Google announced its Friend Connect product recently.

Nico’s employer – VeriSign – along with Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, AOL and others, is a member of the board of the OpenID foundation.Nico’s primary argument (emphasis mine) is that:

Undoubtedly, data portability is the natural child of federated identity (more on that in a future post). Personal and social data are an important part of any consumer identity’. Like identifiers, credentials and profile attributes, social graphs, activity streams belong to the end user who created them in the first place. In the long run, consumers will require full control, privacy, security and portability over such personal information. Therefore, the identity technical community must engineer a new and comprehensive identity portability layer. The new layer needs to broaden the tradition notion of identity federation beyond names, passwords and profile to encompass the full gamet of personal and social data. Furthermore, this new layer must support a plurality of identity service providers who can compete and distinguish themselves by the quality of their service and the user experience that they provide. Freeing our data off Web portals and social networks by creating a new service layer dominated by one single service provider is hardly trading one master for another.

I am in full agreement with this approach. And .. as coincidence would have it, last week I registered the domain name – itsmygraph.com – with a view to beginning to participate in this discussion. I have an early draft of my thoughts. They are at sites.itsmygraph.com. But as a teaser – here is my high level view of the evolution of Internet Users:

I would love to get feedback on your thoughts about the future of data portability and its relationship to OpenID and OAuth.

My personal view is that Michael Arrington had it right when he said recently:

I’ll say what the OpenID Foundation cannot, for political reasons – It’s time for these companies to do what’s right for the users and fully adopt OpenID as relying parties. That doesn’t fit in with their strategy of owning the identity of as many Internet users as possible, but it certainly fits in with the Internet’s very serious need for an open, distributed and secure single log in system (OpenID is all three).

If and when the Big Four become relying parties, the floodgates will truly open and there will be no looking back. And until they do that, I’m not buying that they really support what OpenID is trying to accomplish.

The Conversation:

Techmeme
TechCrunch
ReadWriteWeb