Anchordesk

And previous doubters (Anchordesk) are beginning to understand the full ramifications too:

This from today’s Anchordesk. David Morgenstern, Contributing Editor, AnchorDesk
Incidentally, the main difference between RealNames and Karen Liu’s company [Karen is a friend despite being a competitor] is that her company requires the download of a plugin that over-rides the Microsoft Browser Address Bar whereas RealNames was built in to the browser]

In addition, a long message from Karen Liu revealed a different need for keyword-to-URL translation. She works for the Beijing-based Inter China Network Software Technology Development Co., a competitor of RealNames. According to Liu, the company serves more than 25 million keyword queries a day.

“The biggest market potential for keyword service is in Asia, because there are strong navigation challenges faced by billions of people using non-Roman alphabet languages,” Liu wrote, detailing the competitive market for such services in the region.

Liu’s site “provides a different keyword service, which is to respect real-world identities and to only provide a linking service between a real identity and its corresponding URL. Doing so involves a rigorous verification process,” Liu described. “We are not providing a naming layer, rather we provide a directory-like linking service. We believe that names and identities are governed by real-world IP and business registration rules, and keyword technology should be used to facilitate the seamless integration of online and real-world identities.”

WHEN IT COMES to common tasks–walking, reading, or typing on the keyboard–we can easily forget the differences between people. Millions of English speakers have difficulty entering long strings of data via the keyboard, including URLs. And from Karen Liu, we see that it’s really billions.

So what some of you described as “laziness” can be an essential service for others. Maybe this good idea really wasn’t so “stupid,” after all.

David Morgenstern, past editor of eMediaweekly and MacWEEK, is a freelance editor and branding consultant based in San Francisco.

7:08:16 AM